Tag Archives: Fashion

Swine flu mask + Armani style = Anti-swine flu suit

Repelling swine flu never looked so hot.  This week in Japan, menswear company Haruyama Trading announced the launch of its stylish anti-swine flu suit.  The wool suit is coated with titanium dioxide, which chemically breaks down virus, mold and odor molecules on contact when exposed under sunlight.  The effect is supposed to last even after the suit is washed more than 20 times.


The suit costs about US$590 and “will go on sale from Saturday mainly at Haruyama stores across the country,” according to the Manichi Daily News.


If you think this is cool, check out Haruyama’s other stuff, like their waterproof suit.  Too bad they only sell in Japan!




Lookin’ fobulous this fall: Suwha Hong

Fall season might be a sad goodbye to warm weather, but snag a gorgeous new coat by Korean designer Suwha Hong and you’ll look hot no matter how cold it gets outside.  Born in Korea, Suwha’s childhood pastimes included “drawing princess gowns, raiding her mother’s pajama drawer for dress options and concocting imaginary tales in her head.”


Still, it was after six years of pursuing a career as a corporate attorney that Suwha decided to quit her desk job and follow her true dream as a fashion designer.  In 2007, she launched her debut collection with incredible success, and it was featured in top fashion mags including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, and Marie Claire.

Shop her fobulous new fall collection at suwha.com.


P.S. Enter 110408 at online checkout for 20% discount!  Courtesy of Daily Candy.

NYC’s latest fashion statement: coconut chic

I couldn’t help but be humored by the front page feature on today’s NY Times website about the city’s latest food fashion trend: fresh coconuts.  Move aside Gucci and Prada, looks like the fashion capital has discovered a new summer accessory… and it tastes sublime, too.


“Like banh mi sandwiches and sriracha chili sauce, the young coconut and its juice is the latest formerly humble food to be discovered by New York City’s style set, and elevated — if not quite to the level of a status symbol — at least to that of a prized accessory.”  Reminiscent of Thai beach culture, coconuts have become the trendy thing to sip on while out walking around the city.

Growing up in Singapore, we had a coconut tree in our backyard and every other week or so my dad would bring out the ladder and butcher knife to hack open fresh coconuts for me and my brother.  Now, according to the NY Times’ Fashion & Style, fresh coconuts, sold for $2 to $4, are all the rage, “sipped tiki-style by someone young and fashionable, as they have been all summer.”  Hilarious.


Shadows are jewelry in Maiko Takeda’s new collection

grad4Japanese designer Maiko Takeda brings out the ephemeral beauty of shadows in her new Degree Collection, which, as she writes on her website, “questions whether shadows might obtain a quality in themselves and can adorn the body as jewelery.”

Takeda grew up in Tokyo but now lives in London, England.

Suzie (via UO Blog)

P.S. Dig shadow art?  Check out this video of ELLIS G.‘s badass street art silhouettes!

Chinese bride’s 1.4 mile-long dress breaks world record

dress_1458077cIn an extravagant act of love, husband-to-be Zhao Peng created for his bride, Lin Rong, what he hopes will be the world’s longest wedding dress.  It took the 200 guests a whopping three hours to unroll the train and decorate it with 9,999 silk roses. The Chinese word for “nine” sounds exactly the same as the Chinese word for “old” or “lasting.” Asian people love the play on words.

After the wedding, Zhao cut the dress down to 1,984.1022m, representing Lin’s date of birth, and added 608 crystals, one for every day they had dated.

200m-long dressIt’s not the first time Chinese brides have tried to break records this way.  Last year, a couple in Guangzhou broke the domestic record with the bride’s 200.8m-long dress, which, they said, celebrated the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Oh, fobulous love!



Indian weddings reveal sari-loving fob within

7.19.09 002I love dressing up, particularly when it involves 9-yards of gorgeous sari fabric, bindis and lots of bangles.  Last weekend I attended my friend’s cousin’s wedding, and I’m now convinced that nothing delights (or perhaps amuses) Indian people more than seeing a random Chinese girl dressed in a sari.  My love for all things Indian stems from my growing up in Singapore, where Indians make up the island’s third largest ethnic group and where the president is Indian. Either that or I was Indian in my past life…


P.S. Check out my article on cross-cultural weddings, here!

The buzz around Wong Fu Productions keeps getting louder


I just bought this cute fob shirt from the Wong Fu Store, the merchandise section of Wong Fu Productions.  The characters say, jia you, or “add oil”–it’s the Chinese equivalent of sporting chants like “Go! Go!” or “Come on!”  I love it.

Cute shirts aren’t the only thing Wong Fu makes, though.  This home-grown film production company, run by three super-talented Asian-American guys, has gained increasing popularity since they started making short films, or “shorts,” in 2003.  A few years ago I stumbled on their short, “Yellow Fever,”a hilarious exploration of the Asian-girl-dating-white-guy phenomenon, and was hooked ever since.

It’s awesome to see how far they’ve come, and how exciting their future looks.  They were recently interviewed by CNN, featured in the Cannes International Film Festival, and last year went on tour to speak at college campuses about their work.  Jia You you guys!

Check out their newly-released short, “Dreamline,” which makes me love being from Hong Kong (and it’s the Official Selection to LA Asian Pacific Film Fest 2009!):